Saturday, Sep 20, 2014

We're too busy being outraged to fix anything these days

Published:   |   Updated: January 15, 2014 at 10:34 AM

We live in a time of phony outrage. If someone says this, millions are outraged. If someone says that, another million are outraged. It's as if we've all become a bunch of oversensitive wimps over just about everything.

There was a time when we just disagreed and debated. We might even tune the other person out and shake our heads. These days, however, the Twitter and Facebook universe constantly is ablaze with outrage over something stupid someone else said, or even something smart but runs counter to what you believe. And a lot of it is untrue, because some people just enjoy being outraged. They don't want to know the facts; they want to be outraged.

People start petitions and protest for others to lose their jobs if they say something wrong. They flood social media with pronouncements of racism, sexism and every other kind of "ism" under the sun. The media jumps in, puts it on the continuous loop news cycle and it self-perpetuates and metastasizes. Sources on one side scream about the injustice of such words. Some careers are ruined. Employers, often out of fear of losing business, dump those who are accused of some kind of "ism."

It's as if some people sit around waiting to be outraged these days. They jump at the chance to scream and holler about something that offends them, supposedly disrespects someone, or otherwise is something they disagree with. They believe making a lot of noise makes them right. It doesn't.

We must start tuning out these constantly offended people. They need to be told to accept that others think differently, act differently and live their lives in their own ways. Who's to say who's right and wrong? And there are plenty or real issues to be outraged about, such as violence and abuse towards any living thing and human rights violations.

The phony moral outrage that keeps our country seething solves no problems and only ignores the real issues we face, but never does anything about them. We're so worried that someone is liberal or conservative, gay or strait, black or white, and what that all means, that we're stuck in quicksand, unable to move. But we sure can scream about it and play victims to the mean people who say things we don't like.

No, the loudest mouths don't win the argument. They often complicate it or provide a smokescreen and change the subject. Perhaps that's what some of them really want. It's easier to work ourselves into a lather than actually deal with something important. What a waste of everyone's time.

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