Monday, Sep 01, 2014
Local News

'Aaron Doty Law' supporters want signatures on moveon.org petition


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SEBRING - An online petition to gather signatures on change.org for an "Aaron Doty Law" mustered around 5,000 signatures from sympathizers all over the country.

Now, local residents pushing to get this law passed in the Florida Legislature, want people to sign another petition, this one on moveon.org.

Roxanne Judd, who is helping to spearhead this legislation, said resident Jackie Neabe had started the online petition on change.org before Judd took over from her.

Because Judd cannot administer the change.org petition, since she didn't start it, Judd started another petition on moveon.org and wants those who have not signed there to do so.

The moveon.org petition has 1,897 signatures; Judd's goal is to get at least 5,000.

Go to http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/aaron-doty-a-senseless to access the petition.

"Our Community Needs 'JUSTICE FOR AARON DOTY'.. So we can start the healing for the Community, but not only for the Community, but for the Doty Family," the petition statement reads.

Doty, a 20-year-old Sebring resident, was beaten up at a party last year, and then his unconscious body was taken to the woods and burned, authorities say.

There were several people who were present at this party, authorities add, but no one tried to break up the fight or call 911 when they saw Doty lying unconscious outside.

"No one did anything but videotaped the fight instead of calling 911, No 911 calls were made at or after the party," the petition adds.

Judd, who decided to pursue an associate's degree in criminal justice after hearing about the Doty murder, and other like-minded supporters, are fighting for a law that would obligate people to call authorities if they see someone "helpless" being abused or if someone's life is in danger.

Last month Judd and others spoke of the need for the law in front of the Highlands County Legislative Delegation, where they were told to try again when the authorities had closed the case.

Judd was encouraged by how far they have gone, she said, and is waiting for those charged in the case to be convicted and their cases closed before trying again to get the "Aaron Doty Law" passed.

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