Friday, Jul 25, 2014

A united front -- at all times


Published:

On Sept. 11, 2001, America experienced one of the worst tragedies in its history. Twelve years ago, our country fell victim to a terrible terrorist attack. Once a year, we remember that horrible event with Patriot's Day.

Last week, our nation observed the anniversary of this tragedy. After this yearly observance, Americans go on living their daily lives and push 9/11 out of their heads for an entire year.

Not only does this apply to 9/11, but also tragedies like school shootings or bombings. Our nation was founded on the concept of being united, and when something terrible happens to our country, we are just that.

However, throughout the year, Americans fight and bicker with each other constantly.

This past April, when the Boston Bombings occurred, our country forgot about all of the problems we were individually facing and joined together in support. When the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting occurred, Americans turned their concerns from themselves to the town of Newtown, Conn. In times of despair, America joins together unselfishly.

I find it extremely unfortunate that this unity only occurs in times of tragedy. It should not take some horrendous event to bring our country together. With all of the difficult times America is currently facing, we need a nationwide sense of support more than ever.

Imagine if our country came together year-round like we do on the anniversary of 9/11.

Imagine if Americans saw an opportunity to be grateful for all that they have every day, not just in remembrance of a tragedy.

From the economic crisis, to our own people fighting poverty and hunger, Americans should feel that sense of camaraderie all the time. Fifty years ago, our country was entirely different - neighbors helped neighbors in time of need, and people were thankful for everything they had.

Today, Americans generally live a selfish life. We expect things from others while giving nothing in return. We get greedy over material items that five years from now will mean nothing to us. If we were to forget about the fact that we live in a technological generation for a few minutes, and simply remember the qualities that our nation was founded on, America would be a much better place.

Our nation seems to forget about all of the hardships we have experienced in recent years, unless there is a designated time to remember them. 9/11 is something that affected all of us, yet it gets shoved to the back of our minds. The Boston Bombings, which were just a few short months ago, held an entire nation at a standstill while a citywide manhunt was underway. Now, the event rarely crosses our minds.

If Americans would just take a bit of time out of each day to remember the difficult journey we have had to go through, our country would feel united every day.

Rather than remembering the terribly sad aspects of our nation's tragedies, we should take pride in how they have further strengthened our country. Each time one of these tragedies occurred, our nation could have sat still and mourned. Instead, we took time to remember the victims, and we did our best to move on. This is not something to simply brush past, but rather let sink in.

If Americans took pride in how strong we have become, maybe our country would be a bit less chaotic. No matter what our views and morals might be, we all have one thing in common - we are Americans. We have been through so much as a nation, yet we have stayed strong because of it - just some food for thought.

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